Admitting you’re home sick and dealing with it

Admitting you’re home sick and dealing with it

Winter Travel. Winter travel on an airplane. Winter travel on an airplane with a guy hacking up a lung two rows back.

Yep, I got sick recently from the guy two rows back. I’m positive it was his fault. More about him later. My recent bout with pneumonia (I was hospitalized for 48 hours) got me thinking about general negative attitudes about admitting we are sick and then doing what we need to do when we get sick.

What happened to taking a day or two off to recover?

The over the counter remedies are nothing compared to staying home, drinking plenty of fluids, hot toddies and gargling with salt water. Add in boxes of tissues, hot baths and soap operas during the day and we are usually good to go. Of course we have the super bugs, the new flu strains and such.

But, what I am most interested in knowing is this: why don’t you stay home and not infect everyone else? Are you scared your boss will get mad? Are you too important that nothing will get done in your absence? I rant, but, I too, fell prey to these emotions. How could a nutrition and wellness coach get pneumonia, let alone get pneumonia AND have to be hospitalized and put on oxygen. What? Am I too important, too irreplaceable that I can’t get sick? OMG! I am not in control of my body!

So as I recover at home, I am no longer afraid to tell people I have pneumonia. I am giving away tickets to shows that I had planned, saying no to invites for lunch, reaching out to my clients to arrange our meetings for a week from now, and, as the doctor said, taking it easy. I have accepted that on the one hand I have to take it easy for while and can’t exercise for a few weeks. On the other hand, I am way better than I was two weeks ago. This could happen to anyone. I am going to be fine.

Moral of the story: Listen to your body

Sometimes, your body says, nope, this one is going to bite you in the ass and put you down for a few days, maybe even weeks. The world, your world, isn’t going to stop if you check out for a while. Everyone will still think you are amazing. Everything will be the same when you return. And because you take good care of yourself, your recovery will be that much quicker. You just have to be a “patient” patient.

As far as the guy on the plane who infected me and probably most of the cabin we were in … you taught me a good lesson. Hope you feel better.

If you want further reading on this subject, check out this book: “The Art of Being Ill” by Jill Sinclair

Staying Consistent When a Busy Life Gets in the Way

Staying Consistent When a Busy Life Gets in the Way

You’re super busy. Yes, you go to the gym and eat pretty well, but, you want to be more consistent. You want to stay on track for the long term. Too often, though, life just seems to get in the way.

Go from thinking you don’t enough time for yourself to becoming a ninja planner in self-care. The more you practice planning, the better you get at it.

Here are a few tips:

(1) Be flexible with your expectations. If your schedule suddenly changes and you can’t exercise or have a meal as planned immediately look at your calendar and do your best to find another time that day. Keeping self-care a priority is what gets results!

(2) Accept that you may need to adjust. A 7-minute workout (like this one) is better than none. Eating a yogurt and apple as you dress for the meeting you forgot is better than not eating and being over hungry later.

(3) Book exercise in your calendar with alerts. Treat your self-care activities as the most important part of your day.

(4) When eating at a restaurant, order an extra item to-go for lunch the next day. Making self-care easier helps you stay on track and is key to long term results

(5) When grocery shopping, add some prepared items, like rotisserie chicken and side veggies to for extra meals. Having items like these on hand each week cuts the hassle out of what to eat when you are hungry after a long day. It also reduces settling for fast food drive-ins!

How can nutrition coaching help you make eating well a natural part of your lifestyle?

How can nutrition coaching help you make eating well a natural part of your lifestyle?

Most of us already know the basics of what to eat to be healthy and to feel strong and energized.

The challenge is in how do we do this consistently so it becomes a natural part of our lifestyle (and not be a miserable experience.)

I asked a couple of my clients to share their experience and how it helped them stay consistent after our work together.

Why were you interested in nutrition coaching?

Y.S. Age 62: “I knew I had a rather healthy diet and exercised regularly. But, I wanted to get a better awareness of how to control my Type 1 Diabetes.”

P.T. Age 49: “I realized that I needed someone who was much more knowledgeable than I in this area… a person who had been there, who could also understand what a corporate job requires around hours, travel, and stress.”

What was the most helpful part of the coaching process?

Y.S.: “The daily follow up and weekly meeting were extremely helpful to monitor my progress.”

P.T.: “Setting realistic goals and realizing I can focus on my wellness and still allow myself to enjoy a Friday night out!”

What are the long term benefits you received from your coaching?

Y.T.: “Having a more balanced and diverse diet. Better awareness of my needs to control diabetes. I feel better, have more energy and I am happy I did it.”

P.T.: “I have more energy for sure. I know so much more about what I need to do to be healthy on an ongoing basis.”

Want more information on coaching? Email Sharon to schedule your FREE initial consult by phone.

I’m sitting outside a chocolate and gelato shop and the green tea is awesome

I’m sitting outside a chocolate and gelato shop and the green tea is awesome

I love chocolate gelato and green tea. Probably in that order, too.

I share this because I’m going into this shop to have just the tea. I like this place to sit and do work between clients. Having sweets or any kind of treat for that matter means I indulge when I choose rather than because they’re there.

Years ago I started practicing raising the bar on indulging in treats in order to connect to my goal of staying at a lower body fat percentage. Raising the bar for me means indulging when it’s special: a birthday celebration, sharing dessert with friends, seeing my daughter in New York at our favorite cookie store or whenever I chose to do so. Sometimes it’s planned, sometimes it’s not.

What I don’t do is eat treats because they’re there, I’m stressed, sad or alone. It took me a while to have the talk with myself that if I want to connect to this goal I need to re-evaluate how I eat rather than what I eat.

I still enjoy (without guilt) the occasional indulgences. When I do, I savor it longer, I enjoy them more and I am in control. And it’s good for me and my body. This is the sign in the chocolate shop. That is what it’s all about.